Tag Archives: Bicycle

Afraid of the dark? A bike light will save you!

One law that all cyclists should know is to use a light when riding at night. This is for your safety as a biker- to help others see you.

When I first bought my bike, the salesman at Earnhardt Schwinn recommended that I buy a bike light. Thinking he was just trying to sell me add-on items I said no and told him that I wasn’t planning on riding at night. It was true, I hadn’t been biking in years and didn’t feel confident enough to go for a night bike ride. Well I stayed at the library studying too late one night and I eventually needed a bike light.

The next day I went to Tempe Bicycle to buy a light. They range in price from about $12 to $20 depending on the quality and style. Some can be easily removed and others can be fixed to your bike. Beware if left on your bike, the light could be stolen. I find that most people will leave your bike alone, but if no one is around the bike rack- some people will help themselves to objects that can be removed quickly like bike lights, horns, tires and seats. It’s true, it’s happened to me!

Here are some cool bike lights.

Planet Bike Rear(red) and Front(white) Light

Alternative ways to light your ride:

A bike light is not the only answer to riding safely at night. Here are a few options to help with visibility.

Reflective stickers – $6, LED Bicycle Lights- $50 and a headlamp ranges from about $20-$40.


Just be careful out there and use your head! Cycling is fun and is a great form of transportation, whether it’s day or night. But make sure you have a bike light!

Bike Safety in Heavily Traveled Tempe

When I was a kid, my parents would only let me ride my bike in the backyard or on the side street.  I wasn’t allowed to ride on the busier streets where cars might not see me. There’s no side street for me to stay on anymore. I have places to go and need to use my bike as transportation.

Being on the road as a cyclist can be scary and dangerous. Cars fly by at much higher speeds than a bicycle and this could mean disaster if one of you isn’t following the rules. Bike safety is a two-way street, meaning there are guidelines for both cyclists and drivers.

Let’s first start with the responsibilities of the cyclist:

  • Ride on the right with the flow of traffic. If you ride against traffic, drivers may not see you.
  • Obey traffic signals, signs and laws.
  • Ride in the bike lane if there is one available.  Sidewalks are also acceptable most of the time, but avoid pedestrians and make sure that cars can still see you.
  • Use hand signals to communicate your next move. Read more


The non-profit Tempe Bicycle Action Group created this flier. Click image for a larger view.

Preventing Bike Theft at ASU

I decided to get acquainted with the cyclists on the Tempe campus. I wondered around with my camera in the heat and sun. Well actually, I rode my bike and that’s not easy when carrying a tripod. So I set up a video camera in various locations and watched as people flew by on all sorts of bikes. Not just bikes though. I saw scooters, skateboards, mopeds, motor-assisted bikes, even roller blades! But I just wanted to see and talk to cyclists for this video. So after a few days of filming, I started asking questions to any biker who had a minute to talk. Over a week and a half, I interviewed many students and an ASU police officer specializing in crime prevention. Check out the video below to see what they had to say.

Started the school year with stolen wheels

Editors note: Minor corrections made on 9-6-11.

The fall semester at Arizona State University started last week. In preparation I pulled my blue Schwinn out of hibernation. In mid-June, I fell on gravel leaving a deep gash on my arm and painful road rash. Now I felt ready to hop on my two-wheeler again. Last school year, I was seen peddling as my primary transportation around town, on campus and to the light rail.  I take pride living in a bike friendly city, not to mention enjoy saving money on gas and a pricey parking permit.

Thursday was the first day of school. Within five minutes, I reached the light rail stop at University and Rural roads on ASU campus. I walked over to the bike racks and choose chose a spot to lock up. After securing the bike frame to a rack with a Kryptonite U-lock, I considered its safety for only a second and walked off to catch the train. Read more