Monthly Archives: September 2012

Free Hotdogs for ASU Cyclists

Today on the Tempe campus at ASU, volunteers were giving out free hotdogs and t-shirts to students who commute by bike or use public transportation. I was lucky enough to ride right by the tent where this was all going down! If you are near the MU, look for this gold and maroon ASU tent and a line of people waiting for hotdogs.

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I dismounted my bike and a volunteer handed me a t-shirt and a menu for Dave’s Doghouse to redeem a free hotdog. They even added a healthy squirt of ketchup and some relish- my favorite toppings! It was delicious.

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Cyclists were encouraged to register their bike with ASU and given any information they needed about cycling on campus. It’s smart to register your bike so you have documentation proving that the bike is yours- just in case!

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Biking On Campus

Two weeks of the fall semester is underway and I’ve seen tons of students commuting by bike around the Tempe campus. It just warms my heart! Or maybe it’s the fact the temperature is still lingering in the three digit temperatures and probably will be for quite awhile still to come.

But anyways, it’s good to see lots of students on bikes. So many actually- I sometimes can’t find a bike rack with an empty spot on the Tempe campus. Maybe it’s when I’m on campus that is just really busy or possibly more and more people are making the choice to ride a bike for transportation.

One morning last week, I rode around for awhile looking for a spot to park my ride. I finally found an open spot and locked it up with two locks: a thick cable woven through my tires and a Kryptonite U-lock to seal the deal. It’s important to secure your bike with two locks in order to discourage bike thieves from tampering with it. Many other students have a method that works for them, but because I have been a victim of theft in the past, I now take these precautions. I even saw some bikes leaning on their kickstand and locked with a U-lock through a tire to prevent the bike from moving. As this technique can probably work, it does leave many other parts susceptible to be broken off or stolen. I am no expert, but just stating an unintended possibility of locking a bike this way- especially in a town that is known for bike theft.

My bike suffered a minor issue today, as when I unlocked the bike I noticed my chain had popped off. I normally don’t like to get very dirty, but I knew my bike was an important element in getting me from place to place for the remainder of the day. So I manned up and stretched out the greasy chain until I thought it was back in place. Hooray! I actually fixed something! Or so I thought….until I began to ride. The chain was moving alright, but it was making all kinds of clinking sounds that continued even after switching gears back and forth. At least I made it to my next class. I guess I’ll deal with it later.

So as soon as class let out, I unlocked my bike and rode it clink-clinking my way to the other end of campus and paid the guys at the Bike Co-op a visit. They were pretty busy today, so I guess others were having bike issues, also.

Luckily the chain was an easy fix for the bike experts on campus. They saved the day and sent me on my way to my next class. Thanks a bunch!

Register Your Bike With ASU!

If you ride your bike to campus, you have probably seen many other students cycling to class, as well. Because ASU is a haven for students on bikes, unfortunately it’s also a bike thieves’ playground.

In other blog posts, I have recommended ways to protect your bike from theft, but a simple way to document that your bike belongs to you – is to register it with ASU. It only takes a few minutes to enter your bike’s information and ensures you have proof that your bike is yours!

To register your bike with ASU:

  1. Visit https://cfo.asu.edu/bike-regform
  2. Enter your information and bike’s serial number
  3. Upload a photo of your bike
  4. Add any distinguishing features of your bike
  • EXAMPLE: My bike has a pink bell, white basket and a zebra striped seat.

If for some reason you need to report your bike stolen, this information will be very helpful in trying to locate it and get it returned to you. Trying to recall exactly what your bike looked like or the serial number could be difficult after the fact. Help yourself out and register your bike! Good luck cyclists!